In this article we will show a very effective trick on how we can obtain this dreamy and hazy effect on shooting photos using  a common transparent sandwich bag and some colored markers.

hazy-photo-trick

I’ve always enjoyed ethereal photography and I am also a big fan of the vintage style photography,  and i’m always looking for new techniques to use to my pictures. Even if the fastest way nowadays to obtain these effects is to take a shoot with a digital camera and add some awesome effects afterwards using Photoshop. Photographer David McGrady has a super simple trick for adding a hazy and ethereal effect to your photographs: wrap a plastic sandwich bag on your camera, around your lens. I know its sounds silly, but the results are actually quite nice!  This is smart and simple ideea, and there is no need to spend money for expensive software or photography gear.

First thing, find yourself a common sandwich bag, a plastic bags that you carry sandwiches around in.

shoot-plastic-bag-photos

This is important, on the closed side of the bag, use your hands to tear a hole and don’t use scissors, since you’ll want the edges to be rough, uneven, and slightly random.

hazy-bag-trick

Take the open end of the bag and slide it over your camera lens, you shouldn’t cover up the middle portion of the frame, we’ll need a clear section to see the subject through. Make sure it can be seen in your viewfinder. And voila! You’ve got yourself an instant hazy, retro, light leak look for your awesome photos.

make-hazy-photo-effect

retro-look-trick

Let’s see what the artist has been able to do using this “life hack”:

ethereal-effect

hazy-effect

Another important tip, if you want to customize the look you get on your photos, you can take a colored pen and draw over the plastic bag, adding color to certain parts of the bag.

In this example, the artist used a transparent bag that was marked with purple, on random places:

vintage-effect

dreamy-effect

Find more of artist’s photographs shots using this trick  here and here. How about you, do you intend to use this simple technique?





About the Author: Alex Roman

I’m a 23-year old independent graphic artist based in Romania, Bucharest. I design beautiful, engaging user experiences and intuitive user interfaces for the web. I really love what I do. Want to hire me? Follow me on Facebook or Twitter.





  • steve cp kong:

    T q for sharing.

  • Kathleen Jestin:

    What an excellent and easy idea! Thanks for sharing it.

  • Kenny Paisley:

    Some nice shots there – pretty girl in the last one too! It’s always good to experiment with things like this, the more you do the more you learn what works and what doesn’t. I know it’s obvious but people get stuck in a rut and into a comfort zone without developing the skills.

  • chase:

    This is such a simple, useful idea. How creative! Great job.

  • Karen J. Pottruff:

    In theory this is a fantastic idea. However, the photos taken with this method did not live up to what I consider a dreamy foggy quality.

  • vino petra:

    nice trick!!

  • SPandey:

    If this trick really works,then surely beginners photographers will be thankful for this sharing. I gonna check it out.

  • Leanna:

    Huh! This looks like a fun thing to do when I’m bored. I’ll definitely keep it in mind! Usually, I’d probably just have to edit stuff like this in if I wanted it. But having it be a little more random and like this is great.

  • Orlando Caffarena:

    Can’t wait to try this! Thank you for the tips, Alex!

  • Sue Dederman:

    Wow this is so cool! I will try this sometime!

  • Alvaris Falcon:

    this is a good tip. Also, you can do some pretty neat things by putting a prism, light bulb or just about anything else that’s semi-translucent in front of your lens and throwing it out of focus.

  • Asmaa Khalifa:

    I’m still a newbie with having fun with photography…so thank you for a quick and easy tool!

  • Daniel Grigorov:

    great idea!

  • Hooman Askari:

    I think whilst it’s a bit of a silly idea, the picture come out relatively nice, and I’ve been wondering how I can recreate a light leak for a while so this is interesting!